Posts Tagged Lawrence Block

Upcoming books from Lawrence Block, Greg Rucka, James Huston, Chuck Palahnuik, Sarah Waters, Craig Johnson, Glen David Gold and Peter De Jonge

We are pleased to bring you great new titles by some wonderful authors.  Larwrence Block, Greg Rucka,  and James Huston have been some of our top selling authors for years, and what could we possibly say about a new Chuck Palahnuik title except “stand back!”   The Little Stranger, is the eagerly anticipated fifth novel by Sarah Waters

 
I just read, and greatly enjoyed Craig Johnson’s Another Man’s Moccasins, and am looking forward to spending more time with Sheriff Longmire in The Dark Horse.
 
In 2001 Glen David Gold rocked the publishing world with Carter Beats the Devil.  He’s back with Sunnyside, a novel about Charlie Chaplin and the rise of Hollywood.  This book is sure to be in high demand.

Peter De Jonge steps out of James Patterson’s shadow with an edgy, electrifying, dark and riveting debut, Shadows Still Remain.

 So the buzz has begun with the announcement that Dan Brown‘s The Lost Symbol is to be released on September 15th.  With a mega first run of 5 million copies the publisher is pumping truckloads of money hyping this book, riding on what’s left of the Da Vinci Code success, right on the tail of the spring release of Angels and Demons the movie.  We are not sure whether we will be able to offer signed copies of this title, but will certainly let you know when we do. 
Good reading,
 
John 
(click here to see all of the notice)

Lawrence Block takes it a Step by Step

Before Lawrence Block was the author of bestselling novels featuring unforgettable characters such as the hit man Keller, private investigator Matthew Scudder, burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr, and time traveler Evan Tanner, he was a walker.

As a child, he walked home from school (mostly because he couldn’t ride a bike).  As a col-lege student, he walked until he was able to buy his first car (a deep blue 1950 Chevrolet coupe named Pamela, after the Samuel Richardson novel). As an adult, he ran marathons until he discovered what would become a lifelong obsession—never mind if some people didn’t think it was a real sport—racewalking.

By that time Block had already spent plenty of time walking through the city of New York. But racewalking ended up taking him all over the country, from New Orleans to Anchorage, from marathons in the punishing heat to marathons in the pouring rain. And along the way, as he began to pen the books that would make him a household name among suspense fans all over the world, he found that in life, as in writing, you just need to take one step after the other.

Through the lens of his adventures while walking—in twenty-four-hour races, on a pilgrimage through Spain, and just about everywhere you can imagine—Lawrence Block shares his heartwarming personal story about life’s trials and tribulations, discomforts and successes, which truly lets readers walk a mile in the master of mystery’s shoes.

Order your signed copy of Step by Step:  A Pedestrian Memoir by Lawrence Block at www.vjbooks.com

Donald Westlake, 1933 – 2008

(The Weekly Standard, William Kristol, Jan. 19)

The great Donald Westlake died of a heart attack on New Year’s Eve. When I heard the news, I did what I thought he’d want me to do: I reread a couple of his comic crime novels, dissolving several times into helpless laughter.

Death and laughter: These were two of Westlake’s themes. Or would it be better to say that his themes were life and laughter? There were plenty of deaths in his books, especially in his series of noir thrillers (written under the pseudonym Richard Stark), starring an amoral and extremely competent criminal named Parker. But Westlake seemed unpreoccupied with death. He refused to indulge in a tragic view of the universe.

It’s true that his comic mysteries, like all intelligent comedies, have an undercurrent of melancholy. This is especially the case for those featuring the ingenious-but-cursed-by-the-gods master thief John Archibald Dortmunder and the rest of his New York gang, who gather to plot their ill-fated heists at the O.J. Bar and (more…)

Mystery Writers of America Names 2009 Grand Master Award

(marketwatch.com, Nov 20)

Mystery Writers of America (MWA) has announced that the organization will name James Lee Burke and Sue Grafton its 2009 Grand Masters in honor of the Bicentennial of Edgar Allan Poe’s birth next year. Not since 1978 has the organization presented dual Grand Masters.

MWA’s Grand Master Award represents the pinnacle of achievement in the mystery genre and was established to acknowledge important contributions to the genre, as well as significant output of consistently high-quality material. The awards will be presented at the 63rd Annual Edgar(R) Awards banquet on Thursday April 30, 2009 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City.

According to MWA executive vice president Harry Hunsicker, the Edgar Awards — or “Edgars,” as they are commonly known — are named after Edgar Allan Poe, whose 200th birthday will be marked next year. “One of the great pleasures of my tenure at the helm of MWA has been informing two of the most talented writers on the planet that they have been selected as (more…)

VJBooks